Dutch Oven · New England · recipe

NEW YouTube video: Durgin-Park Baked Beans

https://youtu.be/JEtPWAuXAuY

It’s time for some truly authentic Yankee cooking!

I’m proud to share my favorite Yankee recipes–starting with these amazing Durgin-Park Boston Baked Beans!

These are so simple to make and very inexpensive, too!  Perfect for our Yankee Traditions video series just beginning on the “Miss Rita To The Rescue!” YouTube channel!

bakedbeans

If you’ve ever heard of Boston, you may have heard it being referred to as “Beantown”.

And–although most people from around here never refer to Boston as Beantown (really…never ever!)–baked beans have been a staple at Bostonian tables for generations.  And for good reason!  Beans are nutritious, hearty and inexpensive to prepare.  With a pound of dried navy beans, a chunk of salt pork, some molasses and a few other simple ingredients, you could appease a large family on a cold Saturday night–the traditional bean eating night.

I’m not old enough to remember when Saturdays were regular bean cooking days, but I do recall preparing baked beans for special occasions–such as Easter–and, of course, seeing beans offered as a side dish on every New England menu, including at Durgin Park.  Baked beans are especially good as a compliment to scrambled eggs or served for with boiled hot dogs for supper.  Yes, hot dogs are boiled or steamed in New England and served on open topped buns, too!  We’re weird, I know…

If you’re not from Boston you might be wondering what exactly Durgin-Park is.  I’m sure you’ve figured out it isn’t a park at all, but a restaurant.  A very old New England restaurant.

Actually Durgin-Park was the second oldest restaurant in Boston–second only to the Union Oyster House, which has been serving food since the days of the Revolution!  And, up until a few months ago, Durgin-Park served up old New England favorites–lobsters, chowder, Indian Pudding, Yankee Pot Roast and, of course, baked beans to the masses for more than two centuries!

Back in the 80s, Durgin Park distributed their famous recipes as a souvenir, which is where I got my recipe.  I don’t dare change anything about the original recipe for fear of being accused of making improvements on an already perfect thing.  My only adjustment is to use my new mini Dutch Oven instead of a traditional (but messy) bean pot.

Ingredients:

  • One pound of dried navy beans, soaked overnight
  • 1/2 tsp of baking soda (for the parboiling)
  • 1/2 pound of salt pork (or thick cut bacon if not available), cut into chunks
  • 1/3 cup dark molasses
  • 1 tsp dried mustard
  • 1/2 of a medium sized onion, peeled but not cut
  • 1 tsp of salt and 1/4 tsp of pepper
  • 4 tablespoons of sugar (I prefer brown sugar, but the recipe does not specify)
  • 3 cups of hot water to start plus more as beans cook

 

Instructions:

  • Begin preparing the beans the night before by soaking them in water.  You may need to add more water halfway through the soaking process as the beans rehydrate, so check them before you go to sleep.  Don’t try to use canned beans for this recipe or to rush the soaking and parboiling process, because we Yankees will know if you did!
  • In the morning, rinse the beans and boil them with the baking soda for 10 minutes.  Drain and rinse the parboiled beans and set aside.
  • Dice the salt pork into chunks and peel and halve the onion (do not chop).  Put half of the salt port in the bottom of the pot along with the onion.
  • Add the beans to the pot and cover with remaining salt pork.
  • Combine salt, pepper, dry mustard, molasses and sugar with 3 cups of hot water and mix thoroughly.  Pour mixture over the beans.  Cover your pot.
  • Bake your covered Dutch Oven (or bean pot, if you have one) in a preheated 325 degree oven for six hours, checking about every hour or so to see if the beans need water
  • Top off the beans as needed throughout the baking process
  • Remove the onion and salt pork bits (or not…up to you!) and serve!

 

Simmering baked beans
The beans are simmered for six hours in the oven and should be checked regularly to make sure there is enough liquid on top
Baking beans needing water
When the liquid on the top of your pot begins to cook off, you should replace it with enough water to just submerge the beans in water.
Last night's beans with eggs
Leftover beans are great served with breakfast and also make a great bean sandwich!
Advertisements
recipe

“Miss Rita To The Rescue!”Recipe Index

 

OMG! I *love* to eat!!!

Isn’t it the greatest thing on Earth?

Over the years, I’ve posted a lot of my favorite recipes on this blog, but I do realize that sometimes all those awesome recipes get a little lost with all my Cricut crafting.

Hence this Recipe Round Up!

Each recipe is linked to this index, so feel free to bookmark this page!  I will update it as I add more recipes!

ON TO THE FOOD!

 

Amazing Chicken Marinade

Bacon-Wrapped Water Chestnuts

Beef Barley Soup

Better than Cinnabon Cinnamon Rolls

Beef Stew in the Dutch Oven

Beef Stroganoff

Beer Battered Fried Pickles

Good Enough for Santa Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chicken Stock in the Dutch Oven

Christmas Morning Quiche

Cioppino: San Francisco’s Fish Stew

Crusty Bread in the Dutch Oven

Durgin-Park Boston Baked Beans

Easy Chicken & Stuffing in the Slow Cooker

General Tso’s Chicken

Italian Bread in the Dutch Oven

Italian-Style Potato Pancakes

Jalapeno Cheese Bread

Julia Child’s French Onion Soup Gratinee

Key Lime Pie

Lazy Lasagna in the Dutch Oven

Make Your Own Pizza Dough

Make Your Own Sushi Rice at Home

Meatless Stuffed Mushrooms

Skinny Enchilada Rice Bowl

Skinny Black Bean Burritos

Sausage Tortellini Soup

Skinny Sesame Chicken & Broccoli

Ricotta Calzone

Pasta Puttanesca

Pizzelle: Auntie’s Italian Cookies

Ditch The Canned Pumpkin

Rib Eye in the Dutch Oven

Expertly Cutting a Pineapple & Pera Pena Drink

Whole Chicken in the Dutch Oven

 

 

 

 

 

Cricut

Cricut Access Challenge: Bay State Love

As you probably already know, I was born and raised in one of the best cities in the world–Boston, Massachusetts!!!

With the exception of a few years away for school, Massachusetts has been my lifelong home and I’ve always, always loved it here! I simply wouldn’t live anywhere else!

fullsizeoutput_ee1I’m very proud of Massachusetts’ history of being the “birthplace of the Revolution” and I have always cheered on our progressive leaders as we continue to be first in so many things.

And, of course, I have passed my love and pride for the Commonwealth on to MO!  Recently MO’s teacher told us that he and his classmates were invited by the new state rep to tour the capital building and take a tour of the State House.  Doesn’t that sound like a lot of fun??

And, well….OF COURSE, I needed to figure out a way to put my Cricut spin on the upcoming tour, didn’t I?

fullsizeoutput_ee4Thankfully I knew that the good folks over at Cricut have recently added a ton of new state-related design files to Cricut Access.

In fact, I think every one of the US states are now represented!  Thank you, Anna Rose!

So here are just a few of the wonderful images I found for Massachusetts:

Aren’t they adorable??  And lots of great choices, too! 🙂

I’m digging the mandala-like designs, which will be perfect as a car decal.  And I’ve decided that the simple line drawings with the capital in the banner will make the perfect T-shirt decoration for MO’s special State House Tour Day, too.

I’ll be sure to post pictures of MO’s classmates at the State House after their field trip!

Which state are you from?  Do you love it as much as I love Massachusetts?

If so, now is the time to show the world!!!

And, don’t forget now…ALL of these lovely state-based images are available for FREE to all Cricut Access subscribers…so this might be the perfect time for you to consider a subscription!  (If you decide to order, please use my affiliate link, which is here: https://www.shareasale.com/u.cfm?d=327204&m=51766&u=1089398)

Here’s the Pinterest post for this Massachusetts based pin: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/273030796146123399/

And here’s my Design Space file for the Massachusetts images:  https://design.cricut.com/#/design/126123866

screen shot 2019-01-25 at 10.16.08 am

“Go forth and Cricut, my friends!”

Best always,

Miss Rita

 

Please note: This post may contain affiliate links, which means if you click on one of my links and buy something I will receive a small commission from your purchase. Thank you for using my links as this is how I support myself and keep MO in pickles and Ted E. Bear in chew toys–they both are insatiable!

But seriously….I do so appreciate your continued support!

Here is my affiliate link:  https://www.shareasale.com/u.cfm?d=327204&m=51766&u=1089398

Remember if your order exceeds $50 and you use my code MISSRITA1 and link, you will receive an extra 10% off and free shipping on most items!  My code will *not* work for Access Subscriptions or machines (anything that plugs in).

 

Dutch Oven · New England · recipe

Beef & Barley Soup in the Dutch Oven

Beef & Barley Soup–if you don’t count chowder–is quite possibly the quintessential New England soup.

But nowadays finding a good version can be difficult to find, except maybe in a can. And even the best canned soups are still too salty and tinny for regular consumption.

So, I set about making a healthy and easy Beef & Barley that would rival the ease of warming up a canned version and I think I’ve done it. Of course, I used my trusty Dutch Oven, but I also used my Instant Pot to make ready the beef.

I started with a small piece of meat that was intended as a small roast. I got it on sale for less than $4 and it weighed just under two pounds. Because I froze it when I bought it, I first defrosted it and then cooked it with a small amount of beef broth and some salt and pepper in the Instant Pot on the beef setting. Couldn’t be easier, but note that you could use a portion of roast beef leftovers if you have that.

Once the beef was cooked and had rested, I chopped it up in small pieces and tossed it into the Dutch Oven along with some tomato sauce, a box of beef broth and the drippings from the Instant Pot. I added a can of peas and carrots, but you could use fresh or frozen. It’s up to you, of course.

The Barley was cooked separately from a dried bag of the grain. If you’re wondering where you find dried Barley, check the dried beans section of your grocery store. Once cooked, add the Barley to the soup toward the end of the cooking to keep it from getting too soggy.

Small oyster crackers are the only thing you need to complete this wonderful, homey meal, which is perfect for a cold late Autumn supper.

One small points:

This soup is exceptionally economical. I figured the entire recipe cost me under ten dollars for ten servings!

Ingredients:

  • Small cut of roast beef, prepared either in an oven or Instant Pot, about 1 1/2 pounds
  • Box of beef broth
  • Small can of tomato sauce
  • Can of diced carrots and peas
  • About two cups of water
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Barley, 1 cup, dried and cooked separately with 2 1/2 cups water and salt to taste

Directions:

  1. Cook beef in Instant Pot with a small amount of beef broth and allow to rest OR use precooked cut of roast beef
  2. Slice and then dice the cooked beef and place in Dutch Oven with any pan drippings from the cooking of the beef
  3. Add tomato sauce, beef broth and water to the Dutch Oven and bring contents to boil on the stovetop
  4. Reduce heat to allow the soup to slowly boil off some of the added water and thicken, about 1 hour
  5. Meanwhile in a separate pan, bring the dried Barley to boil with 2 1/2 cups water and salt to taste; cook for 45 minutes
  6. After cooking off some of the liquid, add the can of peas and carrots and the Barley
  7. Allow soup to simmer for an hour or more so that all the flavors meld together
  8. Serve with small oyster crackers

Dutch Oven · New England · recipe

Durgin Park Baked Beans

Prepared in a Dutch Oven, of course!

bakedbeans

If you’ve ever heard of Boston, you may have heard it being referred to as “Beantown”.

And–although most people from around here never refer to Boston as Beantown (really…never ever!)–baked beans have been a staple at Bostonian tables for generations.  And for good reason!  Beans are nutritious, hearty and inexpensive to prepare.  With a pound of dried navy beans, a chunk of salt pork, some molasses and a few other simple ingredients, you could appease a large family on a cold Saturday night–the traditional bean eating night.

I’m not old enough to remember when Saturdays were regular bean cooking days, but I do recall preparing baked beans for special occasions–such as Easter–and, of course, seeing beans offered as a side dish on every New England menu, including at Durgin Park.  Baked beans are especially good as a compliment to scrambled eggs or served for with boiled hot dogs for supper.  Yes, hot dogs are boiled or steamed in New England and served on open topped buns, too!  We’re weird, I know…

If you’re not from Boston you might be wondering what exactly Durgin Park is.  I’m sure you’ve figured out it isn’t a park at all, but a restaurant.  A very old New England restaurant.

Actually Durgin Park is the second oldest restaurant in Boston–second only to the Union Oyster House, which has been serving food since the days of the Revolution!  And two hundred years later, the Durgin Park menu is still full of all the old New England favorites–lobsters, chowder, Indian Pudding, Yankee Pot Roast and, of course, baked beans.

Back in the 80s, Durgin Park distributed their famous recipes as a souvenir, which is where I got my recipe.  I don’t dare change anything about the original recipe for fear of being accused of making improvements on an already perfect thing.  My only adjustment is to use my new mini Dutch Oven instead of a traditional (but messy) bean pot.

Ingredients:

  • One pound of dried navy beans, soaked overnight
  • 1/2 tsp of baking soda (for the parboiling)
  • 1/2 pound of salt pork (or thick cut bacon if not available), cut into chunks
  • 1/3 cup dark molasses
  • 1 tsp dried mustard
  • 1/2 of a medium sized onion, peeled but not cut
  • 1 tsp of salt and 1/4 tsp of pepper
  • 4 tablespoons of sugar (I prefer brown sugar, but the recipe does not specify)
  • 3 cups of hot water to start plus more as beans cook

 

Instructions:

  • Begin preparing the beans the night before by soaking them in water.  You may need to add more water halfway through the soaking process as the beans rehydrate, so check them before you go to sleep.  Don’t try to use canned beans for this recipe or to rush the soaking and parboiling process, because we Yankees will know if you did!
  • In the morning, rinse the beans and boil them with the baking soda for 10 minutes.  Drain and rinse the parboiled beans and set aside.
  • Dice the salt pork into chunks and peel and halve the onion (do not chop).  Put half of the salt port in the bottom of the pot along with the onion.
  • Add the beans to the pot and cover with remaining salt pork.
  • Combine salt, pepper, dry mustard, molasses and sugar with 3 cups of hot water and mix thoroughly.  Pour mixture over the beans.  Cover your pot.
  • Bake your covered Dutch Oven (or bean pot, if you have one) in a preheated 325 degree oven for six hours, checking about every hour or so to see if the beans need water
  • Top off the beans as needed throughout the baking process
  • Remove the onion and salt pork bits (or not…up to you!) and serve!

 

parboiling navy beans for baked beans
After soaking the beans overnight, parboil them for ten minutes
Salt Pork for Baked Beans
Salt pork is still readily available in most New England grocery stores and the best choice for baked beans

 

 

Simmering baked beans
The beans are simmered for six hours in the oven and should be checked regularly to make sure there is enough liquid on top
Baking beans needing water
When the liquid on the top of your pot begins to cook off, you should replace it with enough water to just submerge the beans in water.
Last night's beans with eggs
Leftover beans are great served with breakfast and also make a great bean sandwich!